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Fuji-san logic

XQ2

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#1 Studor13

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 01:19 PM

I recently bought a Fujifilm XQ2 and there is something I just can't figure out.

 

Yes, I have gone through the user manual a number of times.

 

In very bright daylight when the correct shutter speed for f1.8 is around 1/5000-1/8000 the XQ2 tops out at 1/1000 even though it can shoot at 1/4000 - according to the manual. The 1/1000 shutter speed is set in red to indicate that the exposure will not be correct but will still shoot at this shutter speed.

 

When I stop down to f2.8 it will shoot at 1/1200 so I know that 1/1000 can not be the fastest shutter speed on the XQ2.

 

Is it a XQ2 only problem or are there any other Fujifilm users here having the same issue?


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#2 JoJu

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 01:40 PM

It tops out (nice word) when I force the camera to use the mechanical shutter (max 1/4000 or 1/8000 on X-E2 / X-T2) although it could speed up to (fake) 1/32.000. And I'm not sure if I could find that hint in the manual. In Fuji's manuals a couple of functions are described only bascially. I would need to kn ow more - but they don't managed to imagine the necessary information.

 

However, I don't know much about X-Q2 (not to say, plain nothing). Soem of the Fuji functions I still don't understand how they work or why they have to work that (often weird) way. Maybe thxbb knows more?

 

edit: Just looked in the manual.

 

In which mode the shutterspeed turns red? I read a sentence like: If the shutter speed is displayed in red at the selected aperture, photos will be taken without the selected shutter speed.(Page 37)

 

A very good example to what I complained about before: If the picture "will be taken without the selected shutter speed" - then with which shutterspeed? Or no picture at all - but it says it will be taken? Or what else?



#3 Studor13

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 02:25 PM

I've tried A, P and other modes. Interestingly enough, in the user manual there are a whole bunch of pages where 1/1000 is used as examples. It is as if 1/1000 is some sort of sacred shutter speed.

 

As a side note I was pulling my hair out as to why I couldn't get the camera to shoot in multi-area focus mode even though I read that section about a hundred times. It just kept shooting in single focus area mode.

 

When the battery finally emptied and I put a fresh one in, as if by magic, the function then worked.

 

Anyways, I bought it for the wife so maybe she can figure it out. Yeah, right (not to be overly critical of the fairer sex).


From the sunny side of the Alps.

#4 JoJu

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 02:49 PM

Good man, women usually are technically very gifted eevn if they had it with outstanding success.

 

:lol:



#5 mst

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 09:40 PM

Hmm, seems that this is by design, not a flaw of your particular camera:

http://www.fujifilm....specifications/

Quote: "Shutter speed... up to 1/4000 sec. at small aperture, up to 1/1000 sec. at full aperture"

I can't imagine a technical reason for this behaviour, plus it's of course not very practical and one would prefer it to be the other way round...

-- Markus
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#6 Studor13

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 06:56 AM

Thanks Markus. That was a good find.

 

I went through the official user manual with a fine tooth comb and it is not mentioned there.

 

Someone needs to ask Fuji-san under what circumstances would you shoot at f16 and 1/4000!

 

Owe you a beer or if you prefer a CX lens or two for testing.


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#7 Brightcolours

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:47 AM

Maybe it uses the aperture as shutter in the lens, closing from small aperture being faster than from wide open. 



#8 JoJu

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:52 AM

That's not possible with normal Iris-blades, or? Wouldn't they jam in the center? But with other shapes maybe.



#9 Brightcolours

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:10 AM

Don't know, the last time I owned a compact digital camera was when I had my Canon S30, which had a shutter in the lens.



#10 JoJu

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:17 AM

I still have an Olympus X-A film camera. It has V-shaped aperture blades, but also a shutter- Three decades ago the precision of this parts maybe was limited.



#11 Studor13

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 08:29 AM

Maybe it uses the aperture as shutter in the lens, closing from small aperture being faster than from wide open. 

 

Don't know but the attached is the only thing I found about the shutter. It says it is a combined mechanical and electronic.

Attached Files


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#12 giulio

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:53 PM

I think it has a leaf shutter, and a real iris in front of the shutter. This behaviour is quite common, when the diaphram blades are full open the leaf shutter takes more time to open and close since it has to reach the fully open state, whilst when the blades are somewhat closed it can stop before thus allowing faster shutter speeds.

 

Iirc i have an old Canon Powershot G5 that has the same limits.

 

The good thing of the leaf shutter is that it allows flash sync at all speeds without tricks high speed sync and so on.

 

When you need unavaible shutter speeds on the G5 you can use the built in nd filter, even it it's not enough for every situation.



#13 chrismiller

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 11:51 AM

Fuji a pretty cagey about the spec, no mention of shutter type or sync speed on their web site.

 

Sounds like the same behaviour as my x100t has, At F2 max shutter speed is 1/1000, F2.8 1/2000, F4 1/4000. The X100 series has a 3 stop nd filter that can be engaged that helps with the limitation.

 

Basically because the leaf shutter blades cant move fast enough to across the sensor as the aperture gets larger and exposure time decreases. On the plus side it makes your flash 5x as powerful when overpowering the sun. 

 

If your're wondering about sync speeds here is a primer: http://strobist.blog...fuji-x100s.html


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