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Red Hydrogen smartphone ...


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#1 Klaus

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:25 AM

It was inevitable ...

 

https://petapixel.co...hic-smartphone/

https://www.extremet...graphic-display

 

 


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#2 stoppingdown

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 12:14 PM

Let's wait for a review...


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Sony a6300, Sony a6000, Sony NEX-6, Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS, Sony Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm F4 ZA OSS, Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS, Sigma 150-600mm ƒ/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, Samyang 12mm ƒ/2, Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A, Meyer Gorlitz Trioplan 100mm ƒ/2.8, Samyang 8mm ƒ/3.5 fish-eye II | Zenit Helios 44-2 58mm ƒ/2 
Plus some legacy Nikkor lenses.

#3 you2

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 03:09 PM

Seems too expensive. The issue (for me) is that the phones become out dated too fast and updates stop arriving. My current phone is 3 years old and I suspect if I wanted to push it another 2 years I could though I'm tempted to upgrade this cycle. It hasn't received an os update in 1+ years (though it still receives security updates).

 

One could say the same thing about electronic cameras and so forth. They just don't last (not because of durability but because technology is changing too fast). My manual camera (olympus om-1) lasted 25+ years (74 or 75 to 2005). My second camera (contax) lasted 12 years (2000-2012) - but the death was mostly due to technology change. However, my digital cameras are lucky to last 5 years.

-

Anyways I'm just not sure I would want to spend 1200 on a phone unless it was absolutely perfect. Of course (USA) you can no longer get 'free' phones so the price difference isn't quite that great (I think samsung 8 was around $750) as it used to be ($200).



#4 miro

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 03:25 PM

That is the trend. New technologies enables the new type of photography

 

Good examples are 

 

  - Spectacular drone photo/video-graphy 

 

  - robots video /photogaphy - I sow spectacular videos made by animal robots – female turtle robot, jong woodspecht robot, hidden birth robot

 

- 3d photography

 

- dual camera smartphone photography.

 

 

 ..................

 

 That all makes me to think about SLRs and ILS as soothing from the old dinosaurs  period. Just something that old men do :-)

 

 

  



#5 Rover

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 05:39 PM

Are the digital cameras really prone to digital-specific failures, or are they just getting outdated? Or are the failures mechanical?

 

The three oldest DSLRs I've ever used - Nikon D70, KonicaMinolta 7D, and Canon 30D - have all failed, but all these failures have been mechanical in nature so they could've happened to a film camera. In the first case there was something wrong with the aperture lever (so the lenses I mounted were all stuck at f/22... not exactly conducive to photographing anything), in the second case the exposure compensation dial fell to pieces and had the camera permanently jammed at +2 EC or something. The 30D suffered a non-critical failure of the built-in flash ceasing to open.

 

The only imminent digital-specific issue that comes to mind is the batteries getting worn out. That killed (in a metaphorical sense) my first P&S camera, the Panasonic FZ1 - the batteries have all gone dead from disuse, but I think I could have replaced the cells in the battery bodies to give the camera (which is mostly operational otherwise, if "a little" dated) a new lease on life. It does have the jamming shutter button - a result of unintended exposure to tea. (I always knew that eating/drinking around the equipment is going to do me bad sometime :)).



#6 Klaus

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:19 PM

Just in case this wasn't clear - I was not so much referring to the smartphone itself but the option (or potential) of using interchangeable lenses and/or sensors.

 

The smartphone itself - well - it's just another smartphone. Honestly smartphones don't excite me anymore - they are all pretty much the same plus/minus a little.


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#7 mike

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:47 PM

Just in case this wasn't clear - I was not so much referring to the smartphone itself but the option (or potential) of using interchangeable lenses and/or sensors.

 

The smartphone itself - well - it's just another smartphone. Honestly smartphones don't excite me anymore - they are all pretty much the same plus/minus a little.

 

I'm with you, to me the gimmick has worn off. I only have a few apps left on my phone.

 

I agree with Rover, the only real issue that comes to mind with modern cameras (and electronics) is batteries. I have an OLD powershot a-something that takes 4 AA batteries. While it's been beat to hell, I still grab it as a pocket camera. With the 4 batteries in it it last months without needing to change them, and you can change them just about anywhere in the world. 

 

My current Samsung smartphone may be upgraded soon because the battery has seen much better days. I also think entropy happens on smartphones; it just seems they get slower over time. To many updates leaving to much crap behind?

 

Other than that I think for the mass of us, cameras are pretty darn good and there's really not a reason to upgrade, like their was many years ago. Sure, newer and better is always around the corner, and faster today than years ago. I used an Oly 2n till it self destructed, and went to an Elan 7, which lasted until I went digital.



#8 mike

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 11:50 PM

I'm with you, to me the gimmick has worn off. I only have a few apps left on my phone.

 

I agree with Rover, the only real issue that comes to mind with modern cameras (and electronics) is batteries. I have an OLD powershot a-something that takes 4 AA batteries. While it's been beat to hell, I still grab it as a pocket camera. With the 4 batteries in it it last months without needing to change them, and you can change them just about anywhere in the world. 

 

My current Samsung smartphone may be upgraded soon because the battery has seen much better days. I also think entropy happens on smartphones; it just seems they get slower over time. To many updates leaving to much crap behind?

 

Other than that I think for the mass of us, cameras are pretty darn good and there's really not a reason to upgrade, like their was many years ago. Sure, newer and better is always around the corner, and faster today than years ago. I used an Oly 2n till it self destructed, and went to an Elan 7, which lasted until I went digital.

 

I can't see spending $1.2k on a phone..... that the battery may be hard to get in a couple of years and entropy will happen.



#9 Klaus

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 12:46 AM

Regarding the battery - Red mentioned battery packs for this thing.

However, yes, if you add all that to the phone you end with something bigger than a MFT camera that doesn't come with the obstacles of a modular phone.


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