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Ok, so let's discuss of long tele options for the A6000
#11
I guess, once you abandoned DSLR, it's hard to go back. And also hard to live with the mirror / shutter vibrations and noise and all the other downsides (like focus adjustments - I could live without them) DSLRs have. At 1000€, a second hand Nikon CX with native 70-300 might jump into sight again.

#12
Shutter vibrations mainly are an issue with some Nikon DSLR/lens combinations, and mirrorless cameras (Olympus, Sony). 

#13
It must be wonderful to live in a problem-free Canon world. That's the advantage of not having the resolving sensors for quite a while, the little vibrations remain just invisible. However, this lovely dream could come to an end *

 

I think, anywhere shutters are involved and careless damped - which was also for Sony's mirrorless α7R first gen. a problem - one needs to take care instead of hoping this is only an issue for other people's systems.

 

* Edit: I always wanted to speak with a thundering voice, so the next sentence after "word could come to an end" would be something like "This end is NEAR! Regret your SINS! Even the ones hanging around this place a couple of weeks before the big bang happened and already missed the right bokeh at that time."

 

:lol:

 
Always so much fun with your posts, BC.
#14
Quote:It must be wonderful to live in a problem-free Canon world. That's the advantage of not having the resolving sensors for quite a while, the little vibrations remain just invisible. However, this lovely dream could come to an end

 

I think, anywhere shutters are involved and careless damped - which was also for Sony's mirrorless α7R first gen. a problem - one needs to take care instead of hoping this is only an issue for other people's systems.
If you don't want to place things into perspective.....

 

I will do it. 

 

Horsack tested 4 things:

 

  1. Shoot on tripod with ballhead. No mirror lock up.
  2. Shoot on tripod with ballhead. Mirror lock up with 2 second delay. 2 second delay is too short, as anyone with some knowledge knows.
  3. Shoot on tripod with ballhead. Live view with EFCS.
  4. and 4: shoot 6D on tripod with 3 brackted shots quickly after eachother, and with 1 second delay. It showed that on (his) tripod shooting with quick bracketed shots only the 1st image is totally sharp, and that 1 second delay is enough to counter that.
He did not shoot normal handheld, where vibrations get absorbed mostly. The vibrations without MLU are expected, we knew this in the days of film already. That the 2 second delay is a bit short is also well known.

So, did Horsack's tests show a mirror slap/shutter slap issue? No. As you yourself have noticed, you do have one with a D810/800 and for instance a 300mm f4 VR PF. And as others have noticed, there is a shutter slap issue with a Sony A7R. And a number of Olympus cameras which have IBIS. I have read some reports that state that some Pentax cameras also have a shutter slap issue (also IBIS).

#15
 If it's traveling light for BIF that you want the last thing you want is a tripod, Take your D7100 (or equivalent) and your Tamron/Sigma 150-600mm, set it to 1/2000 at F9 auto ISO, AF-C, D21  max FPS and go out and shoot birds in flight.... I go out with a over the shoulder back pack type bag on my bicycle with only the Tamron on the body in it and a spare battery. I keep it simple.

 

  The more gear you have the more kerfuffle you make setting it up......quietly,stealthily, and softly softly catchy monkey!

 

 Hand-holding is no big deal and produces the most interesting photos! 

 

 

  https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Dave's clichés
#16
I would take the LA-EA2/3/4. Essentially the A6000 will be transformed to a mid-spec SLT here.

As far as lenses are concerned - I'd probably stick to Sony. I should mentioned that I hated the form factor of the adapter though - it is far from ideal in terms of ergonomics.

 

I have a hard time to believe that the AF is acceptable with the other solutions.

 

That being said - as some others mentioned it feels a little pointless. I reckon you wouldn't take this long tele option on every trip thus if you do you could rather go for the real thing (for extreme tele) - thus a DSLR setup.

If the lens weights in excess of 1.5kg, the camera doesn't really matter all that much anymore in terms of extra bulk.

 

Or just wait for the Leica 100-400mm and switch over ;-)
#17
Quote: 

If the lens weights in excess of 1.5kg, the camera doesn't really matter all that much anymore in terms of extra bulk.

 
   It's not by accident that Canon/Nikon/Pentax etc. have such a similar wrap around hand grip,  and when you bolt on a long zoom you really need it!  For sports/nature you need a camera that's locked into the palm of your hand, not something you hold with your fingers!
Dave's clichés
#18
I think for the Sony option, only LA-EA2/4 would be good enough.
#19
Quote:I think for the Sony option, only LA-EA2/4 would be good enough.
Or an A77 II Wink

#20
Well, it looks like I can probably add another option: the recent Nikkor 200-500mm f/5.6, if it will be of comparable IQ. There's a manufacturer who announced it is working on an adapter for F-mount which supports AF. Prototypes are already supporting contrast-based, and they're working to PDAF. In any case, I could mount that zoom on my D7000 and be ok with fast AF and tracking; so I'd be fine if the adapter only offered contrast-based. It is 300gr heavier than the Tamron, unfortunately.

 

 

 

I'm writing this just as a 2016 reminder for me.

stoppingdown.net

 

Sony a6300, Sony a6000, Sony NEX-6, Sony E 10-18mm F4 OSS, Sony Zeiss Vario-Tessar T* E 16-70mm F4 ZA OSS, Sony FE 70-200mm F4 G OSS, Sigma 150-600mm Æ’/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary, Samyang 12mm Æ’/2, Sigma 30mm F2.8 DN | A, Meyer Gorlitz Trioplan 100mm Æ’/2.8, Samyang 8mm Æ’/3.5 fish-eye II | Zenit Helios 44-2 58mm Æ’/2 
Plus some legacy Nikkor lenses.
  


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