Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
50 mm équivalent for a 7D
#1
Hello



I am currently looking for a 50mm lens equivalent for the EOS 7D.

Therefore I am looking at the 35 mm lenses.



If I was on Nikon side I would get the 35 F1.8 DX in a heartbeat.

However the choice on Canon side is more difficult.





My budget is about 400 Euros.



So far:

I was considering the 35 F2 Canon. It major drawback seems to be the bokeh.

According to the PZ review, the sigma 30 mm is expensive regarding its medium performance.

I do not have much idea.



Any (other) suggestions?



Regards,

Emmanuel
#2
[quote name='eltoucan' timestamp='1336046186' post='17962']

Hello



I am currently looking for a 50mm lens equivalent for the EOS 7D.

Therefore I am looking at the 35 mm lenses.



If I was on Nikon side I would get the 35 F1.8 DX in a heartbeat.

However the choice on Canon side is more difficult.





My budget is about 400 Euros.



So far:

I was considering the 35 F2 Canon. It major drawback seems to be the bokeh.

According to the PZ review, the sigma 30 mm is expensive regarding its medium performance.

I do not have much idea.



Any (other) suggestions?



Regards,

Emmanuel

[/quote]

Don't be mistaken. The Nikon AF-S 35mm f1.8 DX has rather unattractive bokeh. On the Nikon side, one should go fore the 40mm macro, which has nice bokeh.



The Canon EF 35mm f2 actually has nice bokeh (for a 35mm lens). Do not get fooled by the PZ review with that one photo. 35mm lenses are a bit difficult with bokeh, and just about any lens will have a problem with that one photo (the trees with backlight one).

The 35mm f2 does have 5 sided highlights, but usually this poses not a big problem, and can actually add character.

In my samples you can see that the bokeh character of this lens is actually quite smooth and pleasant:

[Image: gallery_10230_17_71978.jpg]

[Image: gallery_10230_17_1903.jpg]

[Image: gallery_10230_25_338891.jpg]

[Image: 8DE91F04E0CC47B68BD04EC759436139.jpg]

[Image: 4285ADA295BB46E38D51E7954E412956.jpg]

[Image: 1ECF4413380D4203B4EE916CA9884648.jpg]

[Image: DE871742F86B4705872603D0753F1BD4.jpg]



In short, the Bokeh of the Canon Ef 35mm f2 is fine. Just has 5 sided highlights. The Bokeh of the Nikon Af-S 35mm f1.8 can be not so fine, very nisen-bokeh-ish with double line building:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4135706466

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6091059195

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/3780435158

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4410491448

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thaheim/421...otostream/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/6141307524

http://www.flickr.com/photos/alexbrn/459...otostream/



So... Only if you would have serious objections to highlights that are 5 sided when you stop down, you should be fine with the Canon EF 35mm f2. It focusses fast and accurate, and is quite sharp already wide open. All in all a very nice little lens.



The Sigma 30mm f1.4 DC is a nicer lens than one would think from its PZ review too. Most owners really like it, Yes, wide open it lacks contrast, and stopped down its edges will always lack contrast... but that is not something one usually notices. It is nicely sharp in general and it has a nice bokeh character. Just the distortion is a bit higher than the Canon.



I think that both will do fine on your 7D.
#3
As BC states, the 35 F/2 is a great lens, exceptionally good, and even more so considering its price. Its only possible cons are indeed the pentagonal specular highlights if you don't like them, and possible the noise the AF-engine makes - it isn't USM, but the older AF-D drive. Very reliable, and quite accurate, just a little noisy.



Another alternative not yet mentioned, although that might be just above budget, is the Canon 28 F/1.8. The specimen I owned definitely did much better in real life shooting than the PZ test seems to indicate. Actually, it was better from an optical and AF POV than any of the three 85 F/1.8s I owned. The one I owned was usable from F/1.8, good at F/2, and excellent from F/2.2. And a lot less CA and/or PF than anything the 85 F/1.8 had on offer.



Finally, if you want a really great lens for a (short) standard lens on an APS-C body, see if you can stretch the budget a bit and try to get a (used) 24 F/1.4L Mk I. Rendering by this lens is really great, it does exceptionally well in difficult lighting conditions, plus bokeh for such a WA is really very good too. Prior to the introduction of the TS-E 24L Mk II and the 24L Mk II, it was the world champion in its class, and on APS-C I know it will hold its own against, e.g., a 24L II. I loved it on my 400D, 40D, 5D and 5D II, and only replaced it with a 24L II because I essentially was offered the price I paid new for it. The 24L II is very similar, but a little better on FF for a variety of reasons (less field curvature, less CA towards the corners).



With a bit of luck you might be able to pick up a good used 24L Mk I for about 600 to 700 euros.



HTH, kind regards, Wim
Gear: Canon EOS R with 3 primes and 2 zooms, 4 EF-R adapters, Canon EOS 5 (analog), 9 Canon EF primes, a lone Canon EF zoom, 2 extenders, 2 converters, tubes; Olympus OM-D 1 Mk II & Pen F with 12 primes, 6 zooms, and 3 Metabones EF-MFT adapters ....
#4
24mm does get a bit wider than "normal" on APS-C (38mm FF equivalent). But if that is not a problem for you, then the Canon EF 24mm f2.8 could also be an option. Contrasty, sharp, it is one of the hidden gems in the Canon lens line up.

But yes more of a 35mm equivalent than a 50mm "normal prime" equivalent.



There are two manual focus options which might be interesting too, as they both render rather nicely:

The Samyang 35mm f1.4 and the Nikon 35mm f1.4 Ai-S. The latter is nicely compact and lightweight for a 35mm f1.4 lens. Needs a F-mount to EF mount adapter, obviously, preferably with focus confirmation chip, and will only sometimes turn up by chance 2nd hand at an affordable price.
#5
If you're looking for creamy bokeh then Sigma 30/1.4 is your lens. It has some of the best bokeh of all of my lenses. It's sharp in the center, but the edges are soft. This lens is fun to shoot wide open for selective focus. It's a specialty lens. If you're looking for corner-to-corner sharpness then use a zoom like Tamon 17-50 or Canon 17-55.
#6
[quote name='backcountryskier' timestamp='1336146953' post='18013']

If you're looking for creamy bokeh then Sigma 30/1.4 is your lens. It has some of the best bokeh of all of my lenses. It's sharp in the center, but the edges are soft. This lens is fun to shoot wide open for selective focus. It's a specialty lens. If you're looking for corner-to-corner sharpness then use a zoom like Tamon 17-50 or Canon 17-55.

[/quote]

You are better of with the Canon 35mm f2 for corner to corner sharpness, than that Tamron zoom....
  


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)